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When does hair grow back after chemotherapy?





Hair loss is usually a temporary thing after going through chemotherapy. While each patient is affected differently, today we share a basic guide to what to expect with hair growth.

One point we would like to make is that you can often expect some changes in your hair. Some people have a change in color, while others have a different texture. You may have had straight hair before therapy, but it changes to curly thick hair. In others, your hair may grow back thinner. Unfortunately, there is no way to know until it appears.


A good timeline, as shown on a medical website, indicates:


3-4 weeks - The hair starts to appear. It will appear light and fuzzy.

4-6 weeks - A thicker hair starts to grow.

2-3 months - Approximately 1 inch of hair may have started to appear. Again, this varies from patient to patient.

3-6 months - Hair length of around 2-3 inches may grow. This can help to cover some of the bald patches. If you had shorter hair to begin with, you may not be far away from returning to your original hairstyle.

12 months - At this stage, approximately 4-6 inches of hair may have grown. Long enough for your hairdresser to help you cut and style something while you are growing your hair. In some patients, they can do this before the year marker, but please chat with your stylist and see what they recommend.


A lot of studies say it can take several years for the hair to return to its previous style, particularly if it was long hair. Discuss what products your stylist recommends during this process.


Brows and lashes can start growing after 3-6 months. They can take months to years for them to grow back completely. There are products to help with the growth and our aesthetician keeps these serums in stock.


We recommend talking to your doctor in depth about your hair, as some patients’ ongoing treatments can lead to more permanent hair loss. Your doctor is the best person to gain a better understanding of what will happen to you as an individual case.


** excerpt from www.medicalnewstoday.com


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